• 0

In November 1942, the Illinois Central Railroad Station in Hopkinsville was demolished. It had stood at the site of the present Hopkinsville Public Library parking lot at Ninth Street and the River, and the freight depot was just north of it. For half a century, it served Hopkinsville reside…

  • 0

If I had a million dollars for every house in town that has been listed in print as the “oldest house in Hopkinsville,” I would be a financial force to be reckoned with. Our current candidate is the Gant homestead on South Main Street.

  • 0

Henry Clay gave the oration at the dedication ceremony of the Kentucky Lunatic Asylum in Lexington, which opened in 1824. It was the second oldest psychiatric hospital in the U.S. But, by 1848, overcrowding necessitated the construction of a second hospital for the mentally challenged, and H…

featured
  • 0

The second decade of the 20th century brought with it two of our three downtown Hopkinsville movie theaters, the Princess in 1911 and the Rex close behind in 1912. In 1928, the Alhambra made its debut. Of the three, only the Alhambra has been in almost constant operation — except for three o…

featured
  • 0

Out of the mist of the past, the Long-Riggins House reappears today in the form of two photographs, plus a rare and complete set of upstairs and downstairs floor plans, prepared by David Lile.

featured
  • 0

We are transported today to the beginning of that decade before the Civil War (1851) when so many new buildings — both private and commercial — began to appear, enhancing the Hopkinsville landscape. Two years before, a pair of carpenters, actually master builders, made their local debut and …

featured
  • 0

“Oh what I’d give if I could turn back the clock and bring back yesterday” is a line from a popular 1920s song that struck a chord during this holiday season because that’s just the feat we are going to accomplish today.

featured
  • 0

During the early part of the second decade of the 20th century, three important buildings went up in Hopkinsville — at exactly the same time — which elevated our urban area from the status of a small town to that of an American city. These were quite ambitious undertakings for a town whose p…

  • 0

As we head south out of Pembroke toward Fort Campbell and Interstate 24 — just before the elbow in the road forces us to make a right turn — the imposing two-story brick house of James Richardson greets us on the left side of the street. Like a clever lady, who conceals more than she reveals…

featured
  • 0

Traveling west on Interstate 24, just past Exit 86, for Hopkinsville and Fort Campbell, one can get an excellent view (to the right) of the Radford-Steger Homestead. It was built probably in the mid-1840s in the newly popular Temple Form Greek Revival style.

enterprise
  • 0

There was a weekly television series from 1953 through 1971 — which took us back to some interesting date in history — called “You Are There,” and the tagline for it was “everything is as it was then, except You Are There.” Today, we recreate a similar time warp with newsprint and pictures.

featured
  • 0

The idea that a man’s home is his castle dates to Roman times and that thought has been translated as, “What is more sacred or strongly guarded by every holy feeling than a man’s own home?” In 18th-century England, William Blackstone’s Commentaries carried the concept a step further saying, …

featured
  • 0

Sharing some famous words from the tale of Paul Revere’s ride, “hardly a man is now alive” who remembers the Hotel Latham, which succumbed to fire on Sunday afternoon, Aug. 4, 1940. The call came into the fire department at 1:25 p.m., and a just a few short hours later this magnificent Itali…

  • 0

Looking at history through architecture gives us two worlds in one.

  • 0

A compelling walk down memory lane today focuses on the east side of Clay Street between Sixth and Seventh and affords us a rare view through preserved pictures of three buildings that grew to form an apartment complex, which was operational from 1908 until 1964. By examining the photos here…

  • 0

Our subject house — Locust Grove — on Locust Grove Road (accessed from LaFayette Road south of town) was built in the year 1865, according to oral tradition. Were it not for the fact that this word-of-mouth documentation mentions weddings and other events that took place in the house — along…

  • 0

Charles Pierre Baudelaire, 19th century French poet, essayist and art critic, once made the statement that “the form of a town, alas, changes more quickly than the human heart.” Nowhere is this more apparent than in the evolution of East Sixth Street from the very beginning of the 19th centu…

  • 0

It is a rare and wonderful day when one runs across a house of any period where “improvements” by successive generations — each and every one of which most often detracts from the flavor and character of the home — have not been made. We, of course, have one of these unusual architectural cr…

  • 0

Hopkinsville, from 1813 until 2014 — strange as it may seem — has had no fewer than forty five newspapers, nine of which were African-American. Some of the more colorful names of these ghosts are ... The Spy, Green River Whig, The Kentucky Rifle, The Gimlet, The Hopkinsville Democrat, Hopkin…

  • 0

Like so many structures that survive to a ripe old age, the Christian County Historical Society building has undergone quite a number of changes since its construction in 1908. The front of the building we see today is the third facade that has graced the building over a period of 106 years.

featured
  • 0

Four years into the second decade of the 20th century, new, exciting and even dangerous things were happening all over the world. The realm of domestic architecture was not immune to this change and, in fact, mirrored it to a measurable extent.

  • 0

Seldom could we expect to find a better example of a building “hiding in plain sight” than our featured house for today. Built between 1823 and 1831, it has undergone so many reincarnations that the original form is unrecognizable, even under careful scrutiny. This fact can be easily underst…

  • 0

In the last several years, the area bounded by Main Street on one side and Liberty on the other — between Sixth and Eighth streets — has undergone a most dramatic change.

featured
  • 0

Our previous “out-of-town tryouts” have merely taken us down the road a piece, but today we are traveling far away on the Road to Mandalay. Our journey takes us to a unique house in the environs of Millbrook, New York, about one and a half hours north of the city.

  • 0

For nine years, beginning in the second decade of the 20th century — from 1925 until 1934 — there were at least six Christmas trees in the center of the intersection at Ninth and Main, Seventh and Main, Fourth and Main, Ninth and Clay, Ninth and Campbell, and Second and Campbell.

  • 0

At the time that William Howard Taft's presidency gave way to that of Woodrow Wilson in 1913, three doctors pooled their resources to create the building that stands at 117 W. Ninth St., just behind the First City Bank and Trust Co. on the corner.

  • 0

On the northeast corner of Virginia and Ninth streets, an architectural giant has loomed over the landscape since 1902. For nearly all of the 20th century — and well into the second decade of the 21st — this grand edifice has dominated that section of town. Even the splendid Cumberland Telep…

  • 0

The fascination with trains, which still affects an inordinately large portion of the population, is omnipresent in Hopkinsville, where on average we still have 15 to 20 traveling through daily. Some days the number approaches 30. Sadly, none of them are carrying passengers.

  • 1

As you make the gradual turn atop Belmont hill on East Ninth Street and head toward  Pembroke Road, you will notice that the brick Jack Tate house to your left — featured here in February of 2012 — has been razed. Just beyond that now vacant site, also on your left, you can still see the ste…

  • 0

Today, among other things, we examine through photographs something that isn’t there — the early Richard B. Boulware house that stood on the north side of West Seventh Street at the site of the present Second Baptist Activities Building. Richard B. Boulware (1838-1907) was a store clerk who …

  • 0

Located in the Kennedy Community on the Tennessee border, named for D. N. Kennedy, who was Director of the I.A.T. Railroad — Indiana, Alabama and Texas, which touched none of those states and was later taken over by the L & N Railroad — we find a mid-1840’s frame house with a double fron…

  • 0

Late one night when we were all in bed, old Lady Leary hung a lantern in the shed, and when the cow kicked it over, she winked her eye and said, “there’ll be a hot time in the old town tonight.”

  • 0

On Cadiz Road, about 5 miles west of town, we find an imposing home that has weathered many storms from 1840 to the present, still standing proudly before us in a condition that would make its builder proud.

  • 0

While Ulysses S. Grant was wandering around the White House for eight years in a state of bewilderment during the post Civil War period, interesting things were happening in America in terms of its domestic architecture.

  • 0

Not often in life does a hopeful prospector strike gold in abundance, but when it happens, the exhilaration is like no other sensation on earth. As Howard Carter, on Nov. 26, 1922, lit a candle and put it through the small hole in the door of King Tut’s (Tutankhamun) tomb, his sponsor, Lord …

  • 0

The term “form follows function” is one commonly associated with modern architecture, with frequent incorrect attributions. It was first used in 1896 by Chicago architect Louis Sullivan, who is considered by many to be the creator of the modern skyscraper.

  • 0

Literally hiding in plain sight is a significant downtown landmark that most of us take for granted or easily overlook. As we examine what is commonly referred to as the Weber House, at 521 Weber Street, its best vantage point can be obtained by taking a position straight on from Court Stree…

  • 0

In 1891, a new Kentucky Constitution was enacted, which for the first time mandated the election of mayors in towns that were “third class” or better. In 1892, Hopkinsville’s first mayor, Frank W. Dabney, was installed. His 1893 home still stands on East Seventh Street. This year in which Ma…

  • 0

For 116 years, off the beaten path, at the corner of Second Street and Campbell, an important neo-Federal Hopkinsville landmark has weathered many storms — a number from the heavens above and some from below.

  • 0

How quickly one can forget that out in the county there are just as many architectural jewels as those that we offer monthly for inspection here in town. Borrowing an actor’s phrase, we like to refer to these experiments in the country as our “out-of-town tryouts.”

  • 0

May 2012 brings Lancaster, Penn., to Hopkinsville in the form of the 1827 Federal-style home of President James Buchanan, which he described to a friend as “an agreeable country residence.” As we shall see, Wheatland was and is much more than that.

  • 0

The year 1914 ushered in World War I with the assassination of Archduke Francis Ferdinand and his wife on June 28. Charlie Chaplin made his film debut. Joseph P. Kennedy married Rose Fitzgerald in Boston in October. Woodrow Wilson signed a Mother’s Day proclamation.

featured
  • 0

Around the time today’s subject house was constructed, circa 1886, there was a lot happening in the world. The aluminum manufacturing process had just been invented, Sherlock Holmes mysteries were all the rage, Karl Benz drove the first gas-powered automobile and President Grover Cleveland w…

  • 0

Today we look at the progress to date on the Carnegie Library — and into the future — which will include a fully restored multi-function facility that will have much to offer Hopkinsville and Christian County, encouraging tourism in the process.

featured
  • 0

In 1732, English artist William Hogarth began a series of eight paintings called A Rake’s Progress, depicting the decline and fall on one Tom Rakewell. Later, the Rakewell series became the subject of an opera by Igor Stravinsky — with the same title.

featured
  • 0

We interrupt our regularly scheduled program this month for a special article about a church that is in imminent danger. Built in 1888 to seat 150 people, the Unitarian Universalist church at 301 S. Main St. is a structure that is worthy of our attention architecturally, both inside and out.…

  • 0

In February we looked at architects as far afield as New York City who designed both homes and commercial buildings in Hopkinsville. The most famous of these architects was Minard Lafever, from whose design books Planters Bank and Lone Oak were built.

Inquiring Reporter

Author Name: Mary D. Ferguson

Mary D. Ferguson is a staff writer and columnist for the Kentucky New Era. Her column runs every Friday. .

Phone: 270-887-3230

Column

In Plain Sight

Author Name: Jim Coursey

James B. Coursey is a contributing columnist for the Kentucky New Era, with Christian County Historian William T. Turner. This column runs each month in the Living section. He can be reached at jbcourseydesign@aol.com.

Column

Ducks in a Row

Kentucky New Era columnist

Author Name: BETSY BOND

BETSY BOND is a professional organizer/consultant from Hopkinsville. Her column runs the fourth Thursday of the month. For more information, check out her Web Site at www.thats-neat.com or call 270-439-7080..

Column

What's on the menu

Author Name: Margaret Prim

Margaret Prim runs a clothing business from her Hopkinsville home and enjoys entertaining for friends and family. Her column runs the first Wednesday of every month. If you have questions or comments about her column, email them to living@kentuckynewera.com.

Column

  • 0

In November 1942, the Illinois Central Railroad Station in Hopkinsville was demolished. It had stood at the site of the present Hopkinsville Public Library parking lot at Ninth Street and the River, and the freight depot was just north of it. For half a century, it served Hopkinsville reside…

  • 0

If I had a million dollars for every house in town that has been listed in print as the “oldest house in Hopkinsville,” I would be a financial force to be reckoned with. Our current candidate is the Gant homestead on South Main Street.

  • 0

Henry Clay gave the oration at the dedication ceremony of the Kentucky Lunatic Asylum in Lexington, which opened in 1824. It was the second oldest psychiatric hospital in the U.S. But, by 1848, overcrowding necessitated the construction of a second hospital for the mentally challenged, and H…

featured
  • 0

The second decade of the 20th century brought with it two of our three downtown Hopkinsville movie theaters, the Princess in 1911 and the Rex close behind in 1912. In 1928, the Alhambra made its debut. Of the three, only the Alhambra has been in almost constant operation — except for three o…

featured
  • 0

Out of the mist of the past, the Long-Riggins House reappears today in the form of two photographs, plus a rare and complete set of upstairs and downstairs floor plans, prepared by David Lile.

featured
  • 0

We are transported today to the beginning of that decade before the Civil War (1851) when so many new buildings — both private and commercial — began to appear, enhancing the Hopkinsville landscape. Two years before, a pair of carpenters, actually master builders, made their local debut and …

featured
  • 0

“Oh what I’d give if I could turn back the clock and bring back yesterday” is a line from a popular 1920s song that struck a chord during this holiday season because that’s just the feat we are going to accomplish today.

featured
  • 0

During the early part of the second decade of the 20th century, three important buildings went up in Hopkinsville — at exactly the same time — which elevated our urban area from the status of a small town to that of an American city. These were quite ambitious undertakings for a town whose p…

  • 0

As we head south out of Pembroke toward Fort Campbell and Interstate 24 — just before the elbow in the road forces us to make a right turn — the imposing two-story brick house of James Richardson greets us on the left side of the street. Like a clever lady, who conceals more than she reveals…

featured
  • 0

Traveling west on Interstate 24, just past Exit 86, for Hopkinsville and Fort Campbell, one can get an excellent view (to the right) of the Radford-Steger Homestead. It was built probably in the mid-1840s in the newly popular Temple Form Greek Revival style.

enterprise
  • 0

There was a weekly television series from 1953 through 1971 — which took us back to some interesting date in history — called “You Are There,” and the tagline for it was “everything is as it was then, except You Are There.” Today, we recreate a similar time warp with newsprint and pictures.

featured
  • 0

The idea that a man’s home is his castle dates to Roman times and that thought has been translated as, “What is more sacred or strongly guarded by every holy feeling than a man’s own home?” In 18th-century England, William Blackstone’s Commentaries carried the concept a step further saying, …

featured
  • 0

Sharing some famous words from the tale of Paul Revere’s ride, “hardly a man is now alive” who remembers the Hotel Latham, which succumbed to fire on Sunday afternoon, Aug. 4, 1940. The call came into the fire department at 1:25 p.m., and a just a few short hours later this magnificent Itali…

  • 0

Looking at history through architecture gives us two worlds in one.

  • 0

A compelling walk down memory lane today focuses on the east side of Clay Street between Sixth and Seventh and affords us a rare view through preserved pictures of three buildings that grew to form an apartment complex, which was operational from 1908 until 1964. By examining the photos here…

  • 0

Our subject house — Locust Grove — on Locust Grove Road (accessed from LaFayette Road south of town) was built in the year 1865, according to oral tradition. Were it not for the fact that this word-of-mouth documentation mentions weddings and other events that took place in the house — along…

  • 0

Charles Pierre Baudelaire, 19th century French poet, essayist and art critic, once made the statement that “the form of a town, alas, changes more quickly than the human heart.” Nowhere is this more apparent than in the evolution of East Sixth Street from the very beginning of the 19th centu…

  • 0

It is a rare and wonderful day when one runs across a house of any period where “improvements” by successive generations — each and every one of which most often detracts from the flavor and character of the home — have not been made. We, of course, have one of these unusual architectural cr…

  • 0

Hopkinsville, from 1813 until 2014 — strange as it may seem — has had no fewer than forty five newspapers, nine of which were African-American. Some of the more colorful names of these ghosts are ... The Spy, Green River Whig, The Kentucky Rifle, The Gimlet, The Hopkinsville Democrat, Hopkin…

  • 0

Like so many structures that survive to a ripe old age, the Christian County Historical Society building has undergone quite a number of changes since its construction in 1908. The front of the building we see today is the third facade that has graced the building over a period of 106 years.

featured
  • 0

Four years into the second decade of the 20th century, new, exciting and even dangerous things were happening all over the world. The realm of domestic architecture was not immune to this change and, in fact, mirrored it to a measurable extent.

  • 0

Seldom could we expect to find a better example of a building “hiding in plain sight” than our featured house for today. Built between 1823 and 1831, it has undergone so many reincarnations that the original form is unrecognizable, even under careful scrutiny. This fact can be easily underst…

  • 0

In the last several years, the area bounded by Main Street on one side and Liberty on the other — between Sixth and Eighth streets — has undergone a most dramatic change.

featured
  • 0

Our previous “out-of-town tryouts” have merely taken us down the road a piece, but today we are traveling far away on the Road to Mandalay. Our journey takes us to a unique house in the environs of Millbrook, New York, about one and a half hours north of the city.

  • 0

For nine years, beginning in the second decade of the 20th century — from 1925 until 1934 — there were at least six Christmas trees in the center of the intersection at Ninth and Main, Seventh and Main, Fourth and Main, Ninth and Clay, Ninth and Campbell, and Second and Campbell.

  • 0

At the time that William Howard Taft's presidency gave way to that of Woodrow Wilson in 1913, three doctors pooled their resources to create the building that stands at 117 W. Ninth St., just behind the First City Bank and Trust Co. on the corner.

  • 0

On the northeast corner of Virginia and Ninth streets, an architectural giant has loomed over the landscape since 1902. For nearly all of the 20th century — and well into the second decade of the 21st — this grand edifice has dominated that section of town. Even the splendid Cumberland Telep…

  • 0

The fascination with trains, which still affects an inordinately large portion of the population, is omnipresent in Hopkinsville, where on average we still have 15 to 20 traveling through daily. Some days the number approaches 30. Sadly, none of them are carrying passengers.

  • 1

As you make the gradual turn atop Belmont hill on East Ninth Street and head toward  Pembroke Road, you will notice that the brick Jack Tate house to your left — featured here in February of 2012 — has been razed. Just beyond that now vacant site, also on your left, you can still see the ste…

  • 0

Today, among other things, we examine through photographs something that isn’t there — the early Richard B. Boulware house that stood on the north side of West Seventh Street at the site of the present Second Baptist Activities Building. Richard B. Boulware (1838-1907) was a store clerk who …

  • 0

Located in the Kennedy Community on the Tennessee border, named for D. N. Kennedy, who was Director of the I.A.T. Railroad — Indiana, Alabama and Texas, which touched none of those states and was later taken over by the L & N Railroad — we find a mid-1840’s frame house with a double fron…

  • 0

Late one night when we were all in bed, old Lady Leary hung a lantern in the shed, and when the cow kicked it over, she winked her eye and said, “there’ll be a hot time in the old town tonight.”

  • 0

On Cadiz Road, about 5 miles west of town, we find an imposing home that has weathered many storms from 1840 to the present, still standing proudly before us in a condition that would make its builder proud.

  • 0

While Ulysses S. Grant was wandering around the White House for eight years in a state of bewilderment during the post Civil War period, interesting things were happening in America in terms of its domestic architecture.

  • 0

Not often in life does a hopeful prospector strike gold in abundance, but when it happens, the exhilaration is like no other sensation on earth. As Howard Carter, on Nov. 26, 1922, lit a candle and put it through the small hole in the door of King Tut’s (Tutankhamun) tomb, his sponsor, Lord …

  • 0

The term “form follows function” is one commonly associated with modern architecture, with frequent incorrect attributions. It was first used in 1896 by Chicago architect Louis Sullivan, who is considered by many to be the creator of the modern skyscraper.

  • 0

Literally hiding in plain sight is a significant downtown landmark that most of us take for granted or easily overlook. As we examine what is commonly referred to as the Weber House, at 521 Weber Street, its best vantage point can be obtained by taking a position straight on from Court Stree…

  • 0

In 1891, a new Kentucky Constitution was enacted, which for the first time mandated the election of mayors in towns that were “third class” or better. In 1892, Hopkinsville’s first mayor, Frank W. Dabney, was installed. His 1893 home still stands on East Seventh Street. This year in which Ma…

  • 0

For 116 years, off the beaten path, at the corner of Second Street and Campbell, an important neo-Federal Hopkinsville landmark has weathered many storms — a number from the heavens above and some from below.

  • 0

How quickly one can forget that out in the county there are just as many architectural jewels as those that we offer monthly for inspection here in town. Borrowing an actor’s phrase, we like to refer to these experiments in the country as our “out-of-town tryouts.”

  • 0

May 2012 brings Lancaster, Penn., to Hopkinsville in the form of the 1827 Federal-style home of President James Buchanan, which he described to a friend as “an agreeable country residence.” As we shall see, Wheatland was and is much more than that.

  • 0

The year 1914 ushered in World War I with the assassination of Archduke Francis Ferdinand and his wife on June 28. Charlie Chaplin made his film debut. Joseph P. Kennedy married Rose Fitzgerald in Boston in October. Woodrow Wilson signed a Mother’s Day proclamation.

featured
  • 0

Around the time today’s subject house was constructed, circa 1886, there was a lot happening in the world. The aluminum manufacturing process had just been invented, Sherlock Holmes mysteries were all the rage, Karl Benz drove the first gas-powered automobile and President Grover Cleveland w…

  • 0

Today we look at the progress to date on the Carnegie Library — and into the future — which will include a fully restored multi-function facility that will have much to offer Hopkinsville and Christian County, encouraging tourism in the process.

featured
  • 0

In 1732, English artist William Hogarth began a series of eight paintings called A Rake’s Progress, depicting the decline and fall on one Tom Rakewell. Later, the Rakewell series became the subject of an opera by Igor Stravinsky — with the same title.

featured
  • 0

We interrupt our regularly scheduled program this month for a special article about a church that is in imminent danger. Built in 1888 to seat 150 people, the Unitarian Universalist church at 301 S. Main St. is a structure that is worthy of our attention architecturally, both inside and out.…

  • 0

In February we looked at architects as far afield as New York City who designed both homes and commercial buildings in Hopkinsville. The most famous of these architects was Minard Lafever, from whose design books Planters Bank and Lone Oak were built.

Garden Corner

Author Name: Kelly R. Jackson

Kelly R. Jackson is the Christian County Extension Agent for horticulture. He can be reached at 270-886-6328 or visit Christian County Horticulture online at www.christiancountyextension.com.

Column

Marsha Parker

Author Name: Marsha O. Parker

Marsha O. Parker is the Christian County extension agent for family and consumer sciences. She can be reached at 270-886-6328.

Column