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Shelby Glover is the oldest of five children and a member of the family’s vocal ministry group. The Glovers’ fourth CD is about to be released and this is the first one Shelby has sung on every song. She likes Christian contemporary music and admits to loving “American Idol.”

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While many soldiers’ families frequently come and go from Fort Campbell, Mazzie Ellis, 17, has lived at the post most of her life.

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Phil H. Brown, a native of Ohio, was the publisher of at least two black newspapers, The Major and The Morning News, in the first decade of the 20th century in Hopkinsville.

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A woman who was known for starting the first 4-H club for girls spent 35 years as a home demonstration agent for Christian and Todd counties.

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In February 1919, the first edition of The Little Courant newspaper, published by James T. Whitney Jr., carried the news that a National Association for the Advancement of Colored People branch had been established in Hopkinsville.

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Fifteen years ago this month, Virgil Torian came to the Kentucky New Era with a big scrapbook of basketball memories. He pointed to a photograph of himself with the Harlem Globetrotters in the 1950s. In the photo, the 5-foot-10 Torian stood on a chair and tried to reach as high as 7-foot tea…

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Kathryne Irvin Northington was a columnist for the Kentucky New Era for nearly 40 years. Much of her writing focused on events of interest in the black community, including programs in local churches.

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For more than 20 years, the Minority Economic Development Initiative has helped community growth through small and minority-owned business start-up assistance, business training, policy development, public advocacy and employment assistance.

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Vickie Wade has been a certified clinical hemodialysis technician for 21 years. She works at Davita Dialysis and also trains new employees. The most fulfilling part of her job she said “is keeping people alive.”

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Because his father is in the military, Ryan Cummings has moved around a lot. He and his family have lived in Pennsylvania, Texas, Florida, South Carolina and now Kentucky.

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Tammy Ford moved from Logan County to Hopkinsville seven years ago. She was employed by Rogers Corp., which owns KFC and Taco Bell restaurants, as an area manager for 14 years.

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Kenisha Hickman’s grandmother and children all have respiratory problems. This motivated Hickman to go to school to become a respiratory therapist.

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Originally from Carlisle County, Mike West retired from Fort Campbell after serving 22 years and 29 days. He was an infantry soldier, and his last days in the military were with the G5, or the community relations office.

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Paula Moore wants to write children’s books. Working as a teacher at New Life Ministries, she said, is a good way to get started.

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Hopkinsville Community College student Jeanne Dew is studying engineering technology and hopes to work for stepfather Bill Thrush’s company, Power Techniques.

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When Steve Gulneros was called into ministry, he never expected to wind up in Kentucky. Originally from California, Gulneros moved to Hopkinsville four years ago to pastor Flat Lick Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

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David Stevens works as an instructor at Hopkinsville Community College as part of Project ITEM, a program focused on jobs training.