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It is safe to assume most of the 99 students recognized Tuesday night at the awards banquet for the Kentucky New Era/Rotary Regional Academic All-Star awards program had never heard of the classic self-improvement book, “Who Moved My Cheese?” Most of the students were not even born when the …

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Approximately 2.8 million women in the United States today have a history of breast cancer, including women who are being treated and those who have completed their treatment. The National Cancer Institute estimates 40,000 women in the U.S. will die with breast cancer this year. Breast cance…

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The Christian County Imagination Library faces a challenging test in the coming year. Since receiving a $200,000 grant from an anonymous donor in 2012, the program has spent about $149,000 and mailed nearly 65,000 books to children from one end of the county to the other. The program is doin…

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Beautiful weather and a day off from work had me downtown Saturday morning so I could log some miles in hiking boots — not exactly Easter attire, but I’m preparing for a trip soon that will require walking about 60 miles over a week. So I headed downtown in the same boots I was wearing one m…

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If we could change one thing about governmental affairs in the southern Pennyrile’s public agencies, it would be the engagement of more people who want to know about local issues. Too often, councils, commissions and boards conduct business for thousands of constituents who don’t understand …

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This is Sunshine Week, a national observance that encourages citizens, government employees, elected representatives and journalists to protect everyone’s right to know what public agencies are doing at every level — from the smallest town council all the way up to the White House, Congress …

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When the doors open Tuesday afternoon at Fort Campbell’s Family Resource Center for a listening session with Pentagon officials, a large delegation of business and government leaders from both sides of the state line will be ready to speak. They need to convince Army leaders that further cut…

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The power of stories is all around us, and hometown newspapers like your Kentucky New Era demonstrate over and over the importance of storytelling to local audiences. Despite how much media have changed in recent years, community newspapers continue to be valuable resources. We tell the stor…

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Every year around Christmas, some 200 children in Hopkinsville and Christian County go shopping for new coats, hats and gloves purchased with donations from hundreds of Kentucky New Era readers and others who support Warm the Children. This year marks the 20th campaign, which helps parents w…

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Today marks the fifth consecutive year the Kentucky New Era has printed a paper on pink newsprint to support National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. We are a community newspaper, and this special edition of the New Era is significant because it makes all of us partners in the work done local…

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Deciding to remove the Kentucky New Era from its role in an upcoming mayoral debate was hard to do, but it was an easy call. As much as it hurt to do it, we took our name off the debate, not because of anything Democratic Association Chairman Jeffery Taylor wrote in a letter to the editor ac…

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Economic abuse is as pervasive as scars and bruises can be in domestic violence relationships.  Too often, victims must choose between staying with an abuser or facing economic hardship.  Survivors who escape violence may leave with very little: no job, no car, a damaged credit history, or n…

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(EDITOR’S NOTE: Matt Bevin, a Republican who’s trying to unseat longtime U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell in the GOP primary, sat down with Kentucky New Era Publisher Taylor W. Hayes, Editor Eli Pace and Opinion Editor Jennifer P. Brown to discuss his chances in the upcoming primary, what he would …

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A state’s open meetings and open records laws — also known as sunshine laws because they shine a light on government activity — are among the most important tools a journalist has in covering public agencies. Without these laws, we would not be able to learn as much as we do about the public…

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It was, perhaps, no coincidence that a century of “sunlight” was born during the winter holidays, when celebrants burn Yule logs, place stars atop trees and light candles to hold back the darkness during these longest nights.

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Every year for Sunshine Week, which promotes open government and freedom of information, a team from The Associated Press examines the public’s ability to access government files. The news from this year’s project is not good. At least not for anyone who believes, as we do, that a transparen…

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When the Valley Journals of Riverton, Utah, a suburb of Salt Lake City, wanted to know the time of the town’s 2012 Easter egg hunt, they couldn’t find out. The city barred the parks official from speaking to reporters without permission, and nothing, not even the Second Coming, would pry tha…

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Christian County resident Barry Williams will be drawing occasional editorial cartoons for the New Era. His first cartoon is on today’s Opinion Page. A Hopkinsville native, Williams earned his bachelor of fine arts and master of arts degrees at Austin Peay State University, where he studied …

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Today I want to make Kentucky New Era readers aware that a candidate for Hopkinsville mayor will be working as a consultant for this newspaper. Carter Hendricks announced last month that he will run for mayor, and after stepping down as president and CEO of the Christian County Chamber of Co…

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A first draft of history, a mirror for the community, a distributor of news and information for readers and advertisers. These are the elements of a daily newspaper like ours, your Kentucky New Era. The obligation to be your eyes and ears at public meetings and to report on the news, events …

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The Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services and Gov. Steve Beshear have declined comment since Franklin Circuit Judge Phillip Shepherd ruled Monday the cabinet must pay a $756,000 fine for refusing to release information about cases of abused and neglected children. The fine, plus le…

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The team featured on the front page of today’s newspaper is made up of several dozen players who will never wear matching uniforms. They won’t be shooting baskets together, scoring touchdowns or practicing soccer drills. Not on this team.

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Once while reporting for a story about a local man who worked overseas on a United Nations police task force, I ran up against this newspaper’s morning deadline and needed a quick refresher course on Bosnia. When I say quick, I mean 15 minutes or so. This was a few years before everyone was …

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Stories like the one on today’s front page about a Millbrooke Elementary School teacher and her students should run in this newspaper more often. The story is not about anything extreme or extraordinary. No one was in trouble, went to jail or got hurt. Nor did anyone win an award or set any …

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Despite competitive polls, eager punditry and partisan breast-beating, can we really expect Alison Lundergan Grimes to pose a real threat to Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell’s bid for a sixth term?

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A state attorney general’s opinion, which backed the New Era’s position that Hopkinsville city officials violated the Kentucky Open Meetings Act in a closed April 2 committee meeting, will stand. The deadline has passed for the city to appeal the decision, and Mayor Dan Kemp confirmed Friday…

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Here’s a statement that needs to be made loud and clear and often: Kentuckians ought to decide the 2014 U.S. Senate race between Republican Mitch McConnell and Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes. Not Super PACS. Not misleading advertising. Not sound bites. And certainly not out-of-state partis…

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The Kentucky Open Meetings Law is broadly understood to require governing bodies such as Hopkinsville City Council to allow the public to attend its meetings. This ensures citizens will know how each council member votes on a range of issues — everything from admission prices at the aquatic …

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Most of the roughly $1.3 million that Mayor Dan Kemp wants  city council to approve for Hopkinsville’s recreational rail-trail would come from reserve funds. That’s money left over at the end of a fiscal year — money that was budgeted but never spent. The fact that Hopkinsville can now affor…

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Oberlin College anthropology professor Jack Glazier, who wrote “Been Coming Through Some Hard Times: Race, History, and Memory in Western Kentucky,” spent five days in Hopkinsville last week and spoke to several groups about his research into local race relations. The book is accurately desc…

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One question was left unanswered and two others surfaced following an April 2 committee meeting at the Lackey Municipal Building. The committee appointed by Mayor Dan Kemp met to review his contract offer for Melissa Sellers Spurr to become Hopkinsville’s city administrative officer. The CAO…

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The New Era’s editorial board pitched an idea  this week for eye doctors in the Hopkinsville area to help the local Lions Club with a fundraiser. The club is trying to raise money to buy a new camera to replace an older one it uses to test children for vision problems. The club provides this…

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The Kentucky New Era’s purpose as a newspaper is to deliver news and information to readers and to help our advertising customers with their marketing objectives. That’s the straigtforward definition of a daily newspaper like ours.

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If you are a subscriber to the Kentucky New Era, you already know many of the businesses that routinely purchase space on our newspaper pages and our website to advertise their goods and services. Maybe you’ve used the information in these ads to decide where you will buy a couch, your dinne…

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Six members of Hopkinsville City Council oppose smoke-free regulations that would protect the public’s health, so they’ve invented a way to placate a small group that rejects the authority of local governments to enact any type of smoking ordinance. Rather than adopt a smoking ban for most i…

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Deadlines are inspirational. That’s a lesson that I learn over and over. It happened again Friday morning as my husband drove us to Richmond for a journalism banquet and I wrote on my laptop. Somewhere near Lexington, I finished an essay about my newspaper career.

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The power of a community never ceases to amaze me. Tuesday night, we had a little scare. A 6-year-old girl in southern Christian County disappeared for a few hours, and her family, local authorities and the community in general were worried sick.

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The Hopkinsville-Christian County Chamber of Commerce has been grateful to have been a contributor to and convener of dozens of conversations aimed at defining what’s possible for Christian County in the years ahead.